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Mathematics: Algebra Online Tutorials

Videos

Below you will find Khan Academy's online video tutorials. If you click in the top left corner of each video you can find the playlists. There are 96 video tutorials on Algebra.

 
 

Explore Online Tutorials from Khan Academy

Introduction to algebra - This topic covers: Evaluating algebraic expressions - Manipulating algebraic expressions & equivalent expressions - Seeing structure in expressions - Irrational numbers - Division by zero

Free Online Courses from Khan Academy

All course descriptions below are taken from the Khan Academy website.

Pre-algebra

No way, this isn't your run of the mill arithmetic. This is Pre-algebra. You're about to play with the professionals. Think of pre-algebra as a runway. You're the airplane and algebra is your sunny vacation destination. Without the runway you're not going anywhere. Seriously, the foundation for all higher mathematics is laid with many of the concepts that we will introduce to you here: negative numbers, absolute value, factors, multiples, decimals, and fractions to name a few. So buckle up and move your seat into the upright position. We're about to take off!

Algebra basics

Algebra is a beautiful and important area of study with unlimited applications. One can spend a lifetime studying and exploring it (and some people do). If you're not one of them, and are looking to learn, review or practice the most core ideas in Algebra, you've found your home. This subject is ideal for anyone looking to prepare for a high school or college placement exam. It covers all of the foundational ideas in algebra and related topics in pre-algebra and geometry. If you're looking for more exhaustive coverage, then the Algebra I & II subjects may be better for you.

Algebra I

Algebra is the language through which we describe patterns. Think of it as a shorthand, of sorts. As opposed to having to do something over and over again, algebra gives you a simple way to express that repetitive process. It's also seen as a "gatekeeper" subject. Once you achieve an understanding of algebra, the higher-level math subjects become accessible to you. Without it, it's impossible to move forward. It's used by people with lots of different jobs, like carpentry, engineering, and fashion design. In these tutorials, we'll cover a lot of ground. Some of the topics include linear equations, linear inequalities, linear functions, systems of equations, factoring expressions, quadratic expressions, exponents, functions, and ratios.

Algebra II

Your studies in algebra 1 have built a solid foundation from which you can explore linear equations, inequalities, and functions. In algebra 2 we build upon that foundation and not only extend our knowledge of algebra 1, but slowly become capable of tackling the BIG questions of the universe. We'll again touch on systems of equations, inequalities, and functions...but we'll also address exponential and logarithmic functions, logarithms, imaginary and complex numbers, conic sections, and matrices. Don't let these big words intimidate you. We're on this journey with you!

Precalculus

Precalculus gives you the background for the mathematical concepts that you'll use over and over in calculus, including trigonometry, functions, complex numbers, vectors, matrices, and others.

Mathematics I

"The fundamental purpose of Mathematics I is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades." - Common Core State Standards (Appendix A)

Mathematics II

"The focus of Mathematics II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Mathematics I." - Common Core State Standards (Appendix A)

Mathematics III

"It is in Mathematics III that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses [...] Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems." - Common Core State Standards (Appendix A)